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u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli war that will take the pressure off them for a little bit, coe aless the people around israel and soing for. that's the dooms day scenario. >> wonderful, thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> i wou
. are you using that risk shipping process to bring your vendors up to standards, and i would be interested in the tape on using the contracting process rather than the regulatory process. >> okay. we already doing that. we have standard language in every language, that it will follow the nasa security policies and procedures. we have created that and put that together, and we also have the regulations that massive supplements to that that speaks to that. we have also addressed it that way. that is the minimum of what you have to do. what we need to do is raise the bar. once that language is in there, maybe five years old or 10 years old or even five minutes old, five minutes later, the bar is raised and it is continually vigilant. and the challenge is how you can tinley pulled accountability to the contractor for things that are always changing. there is no easy answer to that. you just keep plugging along. >> and you say that is a better solution than doing it as a blanket regulation, even across specific sectors? >> i'm saying that that is a minimum. >> i like the idea of it. the idea of
the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
process ps and other things for the disabled, for us to have some business opportunities with new and good ideas. american businesses will be able to export their expertise and their products in new markets, serving the hundreds of millions of people living with disabilities around the world. let me tell you why it's important for us, even though our standard are good and high in helping the disabled, to worry about those with disabilities in other countries. there are estimates that 10% of the world's population lives with disabilities. not only these people courageously live each day, they live with many challenges and hurdles that could be removed with the rights and -- with the right laws and policies that are contained in this convention. it's hard to believe but 90% of children with disabilities in developing countries never attend school. less than 25% of the countries in the united nations have passed laws to even prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability. studies indicate that women and girls in developing countries are more likely than men to have a disability. unemploym
of us under new historical conditions to help a potential dangers and to remain clearheaded. we must be innovative in our thinking and maintaining energy. we must always put people above. we must work hard and preserve the integrity. these characteristics hold great promise for the future and a success intends is contingent of young people, the whole party should care about our young people and learn about what they have in mind and encourage their growth and support them. young people should respond to the parties outlook on life and sense of values and always cherish our country and our great nation. [speaking in native tongue] let the youthful vigor shine with radiant vibrance. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: the success of chinese characteristics cannot be achieved without a concerted effort of the chinese nation. our common course depends on unity. all party members must ensure unity and must pursue the unity of the whole party and the unity of all ethnic groups in china including promoting great unity of the peoples of other countries. we should complete a
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
new jerseyersey. congressmen this is congressman frank pallone. congressman, thanks for joining us as you go ahead with your recovery efforts there and new jersey our last caller brought up some concern about being able to vote on tuesday after the damage frot the storm.aller brout up a is that going to be a problem ia blljersey? >> guest: wellguest: it may be n the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot tell people that are in one town that they have got to go to another town to vote. first of all, many of them will not have transportation and you cannot even get gas for the most part. it is a concerned. the concern is real. we have got to make sure t
-- there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us on the disaster not the least of them being the possibility of cyber warfare. that's something that television news ought to be covering big time right now. i am tremendously concerned by the fact that the american public and its military have never been as far apart as they are right now. a terrific job of covering everyone in uniform and hero. we did a terrific job of welcoming them at airports saying thank you for your service. we know nothing about what's going on in the military and for what's more, the military operations these days are being launched on the basis of drone attacks, cia operatives, special operations forces out in the field, and all of that backed by civilian employees, civilian contractors, and we know next to nothing that is brought by these. islamic because the reporting is not being done? >> it's because we found that keeping the american public won't stand for a draft and the professional military wasn't enough to fight all over the world else we are now -- we've been focused on afghanistan we actuall
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the authority in 2004. he was exiled to the u.k. and returned to his homeland and is playing a very key role in its development in the kurdistan province. let's make it a conversation, more oprah, fewer speeches, and hopefully everybody gets involved shortly. i want to begin by asking all the panelists to take a bird's eye view first. how you see the flow happening in the region generally, in syria in particular, and where do you see some connections happening. afra, would you like to begin? >> hello, everyone. good morning. i'm replacing my colleague from the syria national council. i was slightly surprised he chose me because he knows i'm in the non-violent movement in syria, and i'm doing my ph.d. on the non-violent movement in syria, and so it's quite a privilege to b
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
or constitutional and republican or liberal and republican. you can use any of the terms. alexander hamilton used the term "representative democracy," we're based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution; hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the colonist raised was he, george the iii, combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws giving assent to take acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to in 1776 was the british constitution. the and sent constitution, but that con cement is the same. there was foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices of those who, in our time, have combined with others to subject us or attempt to to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. let's examine the ideas. the global governance project. these are not hard to find. you don't have to be invi
] on behalf of all of us with the miami book fair, we want to welcome you to the 29th book fair, believe it or not. [cheers and applause] this is a remarkable undertaking. it takes the work of literally hundreds and hundreds of volunteers. we have a remarkable board of directors who work extremely hard at doing this year round. none of this at all could happen without the good, good support of everyone here at miami-dade college, and let's give them a huge round of applause. [applause] >> and we're particularly appreciative of the sponsors. without the sponsors and the funding from foundations and governmental agencies, we would not be able to bring you all this wonderful literary extravaganza. >> and, of course, our friends. many of you are friends to have miami book fair. and a way that you can support this book fair and make sure that it goes on for another 29 years as well. [applause] if you, if you look at downstairs, there's a friends booth, and you're more than welcome to sign up if you'd like. i'd also like to tell you that make sure you pick up a fairgoers' guide on your way out
that he's doing now so when some of us suggested the misreading of the mandate he did it for years ago. he threw away the approval rating to spend the stimulus package written on all this other stuff, massive debt and spending and you had a million people go to the streets around august, april 15th. he had only just showed up and started spending crazily. tarp ii me and you then have a reaction from the movement that reacted in 2010. people lost the elections over spending too much. okay. the first by half to get whacked was arlen specter of pennsylvania. i was working with him to get in the elected and on the labour union demand not wanting to have elections to have power. he was going to fend off the right of center primary and be able to govern and get reelected and then obama said if you vote for the stimulus instead of philadelphia and we can probably do some things to be helpful in pennsylvania and he said i just want a free election. when the primary. i'm going to sign on the stimulus. obama is going to stay out of get out the vote against me and people will be happy i brought someb
around us. and if you think about how you make those decisions, one of the things that we do in the navy seal team is we have an analogy about how you make tough choices in your life on the front line. and we talk about how you use a compass. what we know is that if you take a compass and you point it in a particular direction, that you can walk all day, and and you might walk over mountains, you can walk through a forest, you can walk through a desert, and what happens is at the end of the day you end up in one very particular place. we also know that if at the beginning of that journey you make a decision that you're going to make a change of course, and you might make a change of course of just one or two degrees in your life, but you decide you're going to make a change of course of one or two degrees, and then you start to walk that new path, and you can walk it over mountains, through a forest, through a diss earth, what happens is -- desert, what happens is at the end of the day you end up in a completely different place. and we know for those who are going to read "the warrior's
of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very important issues taking place today. in fact, this past month has been a lot of can aviate there he is going t
of -- used interchangeably. if the dividing line is famous not have a nuclear weapon and then it will become nearly impossible to manage because that means they can continue to enrich plutonium at three levels that define nuclear capability, delivery systems, instrument capability, and warheads. the delivery systems are not a subject of negotiation. the question is whether the enrichment capability gets eliminated. drawing a line at the weapons, the warhead development is not meaningful because from richmond to weapon, and our intelligence capability on that subject is so limited. negotiations are going on. the fact of bilateral negotiation between iran and the united states is a matter of grave concern to the sunni arab -- iranian nuclear capability, totally eliminated, where negotiations seem to be going, to establish some line beyond and richmond will not take place and the conventional wisdom and that is if you permission and richmond beyond a 5% level you are close to a military enrichment capability. so to negotiate with iran, and secondly, how do you handle the enrichment problem? on
>>> joining us here on the sety. is another author we want to introduce you to. this is bryan latell. co herself -- here's his book.roun. if you will start gi giving us r your background.ounciln particularly your cia background. >> i worked at cia and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte
into it personally said it rid of those deductions and give us a lower simpler tax rate. so that is the bottom line, to move in that direction. heitkamp: you heard congressman berg say he supports a one year extension. this is the problem. there's no predictability in this tax structure. we hear they can get kicked down the road over and over again. that can't happen. i want to talk a little bit about the tax proposal, the ryan plan or the romney plan, because independent analysis will tell you this plan was supported by congressman berg does two things. it lowers taxes for the very wealthiest among us and increases taxes for the middle class. that is true if you want to make the system revenue-neutral. in the individual in tax, the big items are mortgage interest deductions. would never eliminate mortgage interest induction. jirga protection, child credits but what their plan does is it takes away the alternative minimum tax which has an equalizing effect for the very wealthy. that is wrongheaded. i want to spend a little time talking about corporate tax because tax loophole i would close is the o
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
it's difficult. they could be very lengthy. and to have effectively used, you need to have a credible threat of violence along with it, in order to get people to the table and to listen. if we're just going to use soft power and niceties, nothing will be done. it is indeed a whirlpool. the turks certainly near the border are fed up with this. off and on. erdogan mentions baby will go to war, maybe we won't. it's right on their border. the turks brought the military to the border to send a signal. this good kicking to in article five, nader. now, that would be quite a mess. and, of course, the russians have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could h
for the people in the region and not just for us. that's why in the book i wanted them to inouye and then i wanted the american people to know that story. >> who was michael and what happened to him? >> a professor at the science of ucla who happened to leave before it arrived to work on my ph.d.. he had gone up in beirut and his family was on the faculty. though he had made a distinguished career in the united states she went home in the early 80's to lead the school during the period of particularly difficult times when it was structured to to the civil war and the israeli encouragement in 1982, sitting with hammes the school was under assault, there wasn't a lot of personal danger, but he believed that going back and running the school and providing an example of leadership has taught the crisis, was the best to do for the institution that he loved me and he gave us by january of 1984. >> by who and how? >> of the fanatical wing of hezbollah. the islamic jihad but comprised the lebanese with shia who had been underprivileged excluded from the politics and economics of the country and our
. you could use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. so we're a government that is based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution. hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the american colonists raised against king george iii in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i'll read that charge. he, that's george iii, has combined with others to summit us to a jurisdiction -- to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws, giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to, obviously, in 1776 was the british constitution. the ancient constitution. but they were looking for some foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine the ideas and practices of those who in our time have combined with others to subject us or to attempt to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from a
for us compete, first we had forces in carriage, and we had cars, now we are in a global marketplace. i was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question rig
of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outside scholars and practitioners we commissioned to look at specific topics, and so over the next several weeks, we'll come together with some frequency, both here in person and in the cyber world to focus on discreet, individual topics, but, today, we begin this process with a more general discussion in which i and my two distinguished colleagues examine broader issues at stake in the middle east for a second obama administration. at this moment, if i can, just remind people, if you could please turn your cell phones off, not just to silent, but totally off. we are broadcasting live on c-span, and we have other esteemed members of the journalist world here with us, filming and recording. now, each of the colleagues has special experience dealing with second terms. my colleague, dennis ross, who will lead off, first came
will be moderating the panel. the novelist will be joining us later. ms. kaplan will also be speaking, the founder of the miami book fair, introducing and opening the weekend coverage. in just a minute we'll take you now to chapman all. it's rather full. we will be beginning or coverage varies and. we are live on book tv. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. i had a little bit too much coffee is morning. it is a pleasure to see you. we are delighted to welcome you to the first session this saturday morning. how are you today. [applause] as you know, this is one of the most exciting times for us in the fall season in miami, and we are thrilled with this morning's panel. first and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who helped make this impossible, including our sponsors as well as blue florida and our volunteers. before we get started now would like to ask everyone to please turn of
israel was hard. does he agree with me that the use of long range imported missiles by hamas capable of striking jerusalem has made this much were difficult to achieve? >> yes, absolutely. it is clear that the armory of rockets in gaza has changed since the time of operation, and although there is a longer range rockets, we seen them launch at tel aviv and at least in one case at jerusalem. of course that is an escalation of the threat to israel. but it only underlines the importance of taking forward all the work on a negotiated piece and settlement in the middle east so which has been supported across the house. >> in august this year in a report that gaza would be unlivable by 2020, 44% of posting in gaza -- [inaudible] what conversation has he had with counterparts recently on increasing basic humanitarian coming into gaza and that continues to increase? >> this is a constant part of discussions with israeli leaders. of course, we put the case for that, and, indeed, more than that, in saying not only that humanitarian relief is required but that the difference in more an open app
. where the risk of a blow is a risk to each of us and those factors have been very successful in shrugging off and keeping away kind of regulation that could mitigate that risk. and the point is we need to pay attention there and we need to balance their, particularly in the united states, we are seriously out of it. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest, he is the author of "power, inc.." our live coverage from the "miami book fair international" continues. there are three authors on this piano and trim panel -- three authors on this panel. we have candice miller, david nasaw, and les standiford. this is live coverage from miami. is the united states of america, the largest and institution, ruling out thousands of students that are a campuses. we are very proud to be presenting the miami book fair international every single year. for those of you who may not know, is to quit never. we offer nine baccalaureate degrees. we are still a two-year institution, but we also offer baccalaureate degrees. with that, please turn off your pagers, cell phones, and others come so that we can
that makes us distinct from the united states. whereas in canada, the united states, you say go west to find your identity. in this country, it has always been go north. that is the part of the country that defines our identity and has so much promise in terms of its abundant resources. i do want to say this -- one of the things we tried to do as a government, with some success, is we come to office with two views but too often in the past, we're seeing. one is that this government is extremely pro-american. the valiant the relationship with the united states. we could not be in a better situation than to have the united states as our only real labor, closest economic partner and oldham of the allied. -- and ally. at the same time, we're strong canadian nationalists and think in our own modest way.we see no incompatibility with that. but we attrited did -- what we tried to do is say there is no need for canadianism to have anti-americanism. because of what does happen in the global economy. let's marry those two things. recognize the states powerful country that should not be a basis of rese
, with this demand on the part of students has gotten greater and greater. for instance, i'm using poetry here and that both said aristotle, talking about poetry as creative writing and so one. amongst prose writers, for instance, people who teach courses euratom carver, bharati mukherjee, lynn hitching in, victim chandra you may know because he wrote secret games that we were all astonished and where the department does and because he got a $10 million advance. but he's still teaching all these years and is still in very good spirits about that, and maybe even in better spirits now that that's behind him. as well as melanie abrams chandra. amongst poets, john sharp turkoman cease coca scum who is here, lynn hitching in, jeffrey g o'bryan, whose new book of poems i met robert hast, who you may know as a poet laureate of the states and also won a pulitzer prize for national book award a couple of years ago and is very, very popular teacher. besides that come with always had great visitors from around the world. this year, for instance, there is a woman poet from ireland, catherine walsh. i was
. given that public funds are so precious does the prime minister really think it was a good use of taxpayers' money to waste 1 hundred million pounds on a crime committee election? >> right across the country we're going to have local foreign order champions who will stand up and make sure we get a good deal from the police. i have noticed there are two criticisms of the police and crime commissioners. on the one hand they said this been too much money and on the other hand they said we did on spending of promoting it. i can have one criticism or the other but not both? >> the british government borrowed money at record low levels saying taxpayers billions of pounds. >> my friend makes a good point. because we have an incredible plan to get on top of debt and deficit, to show how we will pay our way in the world we have record low interest rates. low interest rates described by the shatter chancellor as a key test of economic credibility. >> ed miller band? >> can i start by joining the prime minister in paying tribute to walter berry of first battalion richmond of scotland. he
, and they can, perhaps, enlighten us on what went right and wrong. obviously, it was not all hunky dory. many people lost power. is that something that could not be prevented? is it something that if we change certain things might be prevented in the future? you know, last summer a storm knockedded out 9-1-1 on the east coast. it's becoming more and more common place. a hearing would allow us to invest gait the reliability of the networks and identify and highlight best practices, and when necessary, address as a -- vulnerabilities in the infrastructure. i want to hear what the telecommunications industry has to say, and they can help enlighten congress as to what we should be doing to prevent this from happening in the future. >> host: representative engel, have you heard back from chairman upton? >> caller: we have not, but the letter was just recently sent out to chairman upton and the chairman of the subcommittee. this hearing, this proposed hearing is, again, not to be at adversary yal in any way, shape, or form. it should be bipartisan. we want to find out what happened, and i don't thi
contradicted that. and if that is the case, that it requires a successful negotiation, then it requires us to encourage both parties into the negotiation to allow will need to do in the negotiation. that is a successful logic. >> thank you, mr. speaker. they played a role in obtaining a cease-fire. what do you suggest and bringing normality to this troubled region? >> absolutely. there is a major opportunity for the new egypt to do that now. last week, i congratulated him on the effort that egypt has made in the efforts on further negotiations. trying to open up gaza and prevent the smuggling of weapons. if that can be achieved, they can continue their efforts on broader issues. >> no one would doubt the integrity or honesty, or the diligent ways trying to bring about peace of the middle east, but we are concerned that we are on the wrong side of the argument. we should be with honorable friends on the side of the house have referred to the nature of 6% against -- [inaudible] the secretary is saying that we should not place preconditions for the palestinians should not place preconditions
close to articulating it, you know? when we did finally move up into a trailer park, to us that was taking a huge step up in the world. we had running water, electricity. that was the lap of luxury after what we had experienced. there was times when i was a kid that we live inside places where we would literally have to haul water in this buckets back to the house and then heat it over a fire and pour it into the tub just to take a bath. >> did that feel to you like that was going to be the rest of your life in one way or another, being a pretty poor person in that part of the world, or did you kind of have aspirations and dreams to get out of there? >> i did. i wanted to get out of there. but at the same time it's almost like that was all i'd known my entire life, so there was part of me that didn't believe that anything else actually existed. you know, when i would watch tv shows about, you know, places like new york or los angeles, or i would see shows where people went to college, to me that was something that, um, it didn't really exist, you know? it's on tv, but i don
"everything bad is good for you: how today's popular culture is actually making us smarter", he writes the great unsung story of our culture today is how many welcome trends are going up. anthony in san antonio, texas. you are on booktv with steven johnson. >> caller: good morning, mr. johnson. let me just say what a distinct pleasure it is to talk to you. i want to say in 2005, i was a counselor educator and i taught a continuing education class counselors throughout the san antonio community. believe me, i used your book, the looks were bewilderment and total aggravation. the title freak them out. learning is prefigured. the kids were teaching me. i didn't know anything about computers. how are we going to use it to guard against plagiarism? this had nothing to do with it. the resistance, as the time went on, and when i wrote my little blurb on amazon at 11 responses, only two people agreed with it. so this resistance among practitioners had to be tremendous. when the little kid wrote the iphone initiative about two or three years ago, and i played that in one of my classes, the ones
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican tom davis and democrat martin who each chaired their respective parties' campaign committees. >> when i watch c-span, i watch the morning journal. i like the give and take there. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the callers. i don't call myself, but i like to hear the callers. some of them are unusual, to say the least. some of them are thought-provoking too. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just at every event, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in many 1979 -- in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, representative michele bachmann faces
months as i said, and he ended up injurying himself into an innovative program using acupuncture and meditation and other techniques to wean him off all the drugs he was on, and through this program, he actually was able to walk out of walter reid on his own two feet so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for, one, allowing us to tell this story, both the good and the bad, but for recognizing this problem, by recognizing that there is this problem of over medication, and that they are looking for outside the block ideas on how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film, really, the metaphor of the "escape fire" that the status quo is not working, and we have to look for outside the box ideas. >> more with the producer and directser of "escape fire" the fight to rescue america's health care sunday night at eight on c-span's "q&a." >> coverage continues with a forum hosted by the strategy firm laslow strategies. you'll hear from greenberg and ralph reed from the faith and freedom coalition. up first, the white house communications director,
pashtun no more like to briefly that it is gone, finished. that's what the international media tells us. that's what our politicians tell us. that's what the cab driver will tell you. it's time they say to prepare and realign for a world where america doesn't count. it's time to get with the chinese, they say. it's time to change the way do we see the world. and every time i hear these themes, i think just you wait. [applause] >> just you wait until the americans respond to the timeless creed says, coming take it. just you wait until the american -- just you wait until every capture their mojo. just you wait until they elect a new president, one that doesn't aspire to a european model that is disintegrating before our very eyes. just you wait until they step out of their pickup trucks with their shoulders back, their heads held high, and they declare i'm coming back and i'm coming back bigger and bigger than before. just you wait. [applause] i'll tell you this. there are so many wonderful americans doing so many great things. you are only ever five minutes away from a renaissance. despa
. that achievement would jeopardize u.s. national security interests, would pose an existential threat to the state of israel and would result in a regional nuclear arms race that would further destabilize the region. the news out of iran is dire. just this week, the director of the international atomic energy administration told the press that iran has not slowed its enrichment activities. the international atomic energy administration also suspects that iran has conducted live tests of conventional explosives that could be used to detonate a nuclear weapon at the military base, the facility the iranians have denied access to by the international atomic energy administration. between may and august of this year, iran doubled the number of centrifuges at its fortified facility buried deep inside a mountain to protect it against strikes. iran now has over 2,140 centrifuges for enriching uranium, and it continues to enrich to 20%. iran claims it needs this higher grade uranium for its peaceful nuclear program, but a country with peaceful ambitions doesn't enrich uranium in defiance of u.n. security c
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